Relational security training

Core relational security training - (5hrs)

This development workshop can be delivered to any number of delegates.  It’s ideal for anyone who has regular contact with patients, including non-clinical support staff.
The emphasis of this session is on developing a solid understanding of what relational security is, what the risks of certain behaviours can be, communicating as a team, speaking up and having the confidence to act. 

The session covers:

  • What is relational security?

  • Managing the balance between clinical excellence and security

  • The relational security model explained (Boundaries, Therapy, Patient mix, Patient dynamic, Inside world, Physical environment, Visitors and Outside contact) 

  • Considering priorities for any further work individuals/teams need to take forward.

 
This has made me SO aware of my actions and how I need to behave as a primary nurse.
Session was interactive and constructive. Liz pushed us to commit to actions [so] there was a plan developed/a way forward.
Facilitator really knowledgeable and she encouraged us to speak our minds so we had really honest discussions.
 
[I enjoyed] how interactive it was. Not just relying on slides.

Relational security training (leadership edition) - (5hrs)

This workshop expands on the core relational security training by (in addition to the core material) helping service managers explore what they can do to equip, empower and support their staff to deliver good relational security.  It’s aimed at service managers, clinical department heads and nurse leaders. 

The session covers:

  • What is relational security?
  • Managing the balance between clinical excellence and security
  • The relational security model explained (Boundaries, Therapy, Patient mix, Patient dynamic, Inside world, Physical environment, Visitors and Outside contact) 
  • The key responsibilities of and challenges for effective leaders 
  • Resources and methods for managers to improve relational security 
  • Considering priorities for the way forward.
 
It made me think about what I’m doing as a manager. As a team we should look at what we are doing and how we can make things better.
Really engaging discussions about boundaries and restrictive practice. I’m definitely going to re-look at some of the old policies we have in place.
Very engaging, very relevant to us, very interactive.
 
[I enjoyed] how relevant the training was and tailored to our needs.

MDT relational security development sessions - (2 x half day sessions)

We tested this approach for the first time at East London Foundation Trust in 2016 and immediately developed a preference for it as the best way of developing sustained knowledge and commitment to change in multi-disciplinary teams.  Over one day (or two half-days); the full care team meet together to work on issues of relational security.  

Full team means everyone: responsible clinician, psychology, social work, OT, education, qualified and support nursing…and anyone else who regularly engages with your patients: admin, bank staff, cleaning etc.  

These sessions follow the core material, but importantly they’re also driven by issues specific to the ward’s patient population, diagnostic group, staff capability/experience and any recent incidents.  

The workshops can be undertaken closely together or over a few months as part of an annual programme, counting as the annual update (and a lot more besides).  Each session will be developed in partnership with the clinical leader of the service to design and focus the sessions specifically for the ward’s needs.  That might include using recent case examples or clinical case studies. 

 
Liz is an exceptional presenter. Loved her ‘direct’ style. Really enjoyed her views
A really welcome process and refreshingly interactive compared with other security training. Because we worked as a team, I expect today’s session to help keep us in focus on the goals we’ve identified immediately
This session allowed proper discussion and exploring all of the teams thoughts on key relational issues. The lack of rigid presentation/format allowed this
 
We can now talk about boundaries in the context of restrictive practice with much more confidence